General

See inside Hart & Co’s Kitchen of the Year, designed by Studio Atelier’s Kimberley Swinyard

See inside Hart & Co’s Kitchen of the Year, designed by Studio Atelier’s Kimberley Swinyard

As an avid cook and frequent entertainer, the kitchen really is the heart of the home for Ngaire Beck and her family.

“I call it Grand Central Station because there’s always people coming through,” laughs Beck.

“My husband and I do lots of entertaining and we make big roasts, barbecue and have people over for drinks constantly.”

The kitchen was designed by Studio Atelier’s Kimberley Swinyard, whose work in this home saw her crowned Designer of the Year at the Hart & Co. Kitchen and Laundry Design Awards last week.

“We had to really consider the flow of the spaces and then put a huge emphasis on how the indoors relates to the outdoors,” explains Swinyard. “We have made it feel generous and flowing and created the illusion of having more.”

Camera IconNgaire Beck’s new two-storey home has an abundance of natural light. Credit: Ross Swanborough/The West Australian

Located in Peppermint Grove, the new two-storey home is warm and inviting, with a mixture of textures and abundance of natural light, thanks to the floor to ceiling glass doors. The kitchen not only feels spacious and relaxing, but seamlessly connects with the outside.

“We love the light and just open all the glass doors to the outside area,” says Swinyard. “Now that spring has sprung, everything’s coming to light. We just get this beautiful soft green light coming through.”

The natural movement of the granite stone tops, combined with the pop of green cabinetry and dark herringbone floors, adds depth to the space.

“I like the colour and the calmness, it’s not a frenetic space, it’s very calming and I love cooking, so I’m always making and baking,” Beck says.

The curved edge of the benchtop is mirrored in the bulkhead, and the large dining table. A bronze mirrored splashback brings the outdoors in and reflects natural light into the space.

“The warmer bronzy/metallic tones lift the space and make it contemporary and modern, without being too in your face,” says Swinyard. “I think it’s that kind of fine line between creating something that’s classical and soft, but still has that point of difference.”

A hidden scullery and study nook was incorporated into the design.
Camera IconA hidden scullery and study nook was incorporated into the design. Credit: Ross Swanborough/The West Australian

Custom cabinetry provides ample storage for appliances, while the fridge is integrated for a seamless effect. Long, deep draws and a hidden scullery and study nook are incorporated into the design.

“When we do custom kitchens, we normally do an audit of what the client has and ask them to measure their largest pot or serving bowl . . . there’s nothing worse than going through the whole exercise and then not having space to put things,” Swinyard explains.

The family’s collection of personal art and antiques were also considered and celebrated in the design, with wall space even allocated in the scullery for art.

“When we designed it, we purposely left a breather there so that when you walk past it’s not just utilitarian and cupboards,” explains Swinyard.

Kimberley Swinyard won the Designer of the Year Award and the Kitchen Design Excellence Award (over $60,000) category at the Hart & Co. Kitchen and Laundry Design Awards.